We all know someone who can never apologize or admit wrong doing. We all make mistakes, so why can’t people learn? The reason for this is actually quite simple. But first, think about your own life and if you are someone who fits this criteria. Do you find yourself unable to apologize? If so, this information will greatly help you uncover why and begin to address that.

sorry

Those who are unable to apologize may annoy us since we often expect to hear, “I’m sorry,” when something unfortunate happens to us caused by another individual. When we don’t get this apology, we often find the other person to be rude. Much the same as someone who can’t say, “Thank You,” after you helped them.

There are a variety of reasons why someone can’t apologize. Let’s look at an example. A man bumps into someone walking down the street or entering a doorway. The polite thing would be to apologize since this was an accident. However, what if it wasn’t? What if the act was deliberate? In either scenario, the inability for the person to apologize often comes across as rude. This person may be having a bad day and wrapped up in their head with scenarios. Other times they may feel superior to others and don’t feel the need to apologize. Whatever the case may be, there is no justification for their actions.

Inconsiderate yuppie crashes into young businesswoman walking home.

People who can’t apologize often have a hard time admitting they were wrong. Often this can stem from insecurities, or other issues that make them angry and ashamed of themselves for being vulnerable. They may feel that admitting to being wrong is a sign of weakness. A true sign of strength is admitting that you do not know all, and instead have a great deal to learn. This leaves possibilities open for you to grow from your mistakes. Otherwise, you’ll continue to make the same mistakes over and over again.

Accusation guilty person girl. Sad embarrassed woman looking down many fingers pointing at her

If you find yourself unable to apologize, and some of these may fit you, understand that the first step to improving yourself is to come out of denial and admit you were wrong. This is the hardest challenge, so to assist you with this process, realize that growth comes from being able to admit you were wrong about something, learning from your mistakes, and implementing a better plan to succeed.

The fact is that we all make mistakes, and we all do things to others that hurt them and ourselves. We may regret our actions if we have empathy for these people, but when you can’t take responsibility or feel sorry for something you’ve done, take a good look at yourself and dive deep into your mind to discover the source.

Sometimes the lack of ability to apologize comes from deep rooted stress at home, work, financial issues, personal issues, and so on. Remedy this by reflecting on your life and making the changes today, no matter how difficult, to be grateful and apologize for your wrongdoings. That’s what makes you a strong person.

And if you are someone who is tired of the people who don’t apologize, if they are close to you, let them know how you truly feel about their lack of emotional support and empathy. Sometimes people don’t realize they’ve done anything wrong to upset you until you open up and let them know.

Let me know how this works for you. Have a great day!

Additional Info

Many of us struggle with admitting we were wrong, but I’ve realized over the years that admitting when we are wrong and changing ourselves is a sign of strength. I have even had a hard time admitting I was wrong about certain situations. Even though I would build this defense like it wasn’t affecting me, it was. Similarly, apologies can be hard, and I struggled with them because I felt that I was the one that was right and the other person wasn’t worthy of my apology. This was largely when I was far younger, but the fact remains, I had insecurities that needed to be remedied. Once I did that, and changed myself, so much improved in my life.


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